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5 Flooring Types to Consider When Designing a Minimalist Home

Designing a minimalist home can not only provide you with a beautiful finished, peaceful interior, but it can also leave your home clutter-free, turning the space into an oasis of relaxation. Opting for a minimalist design can be a challenge at times, as clutter is something that we all collect, whether we want to admit it or not.

The average American home has over 300,000 things inside it, so if you’re going to fully embrace minimalist design, you may want to start by getting rid of some of the redundant items before stepping foot in your new home.

Photo by Rachel Claire from Pexels

To complete a coherent, minimalist design that will be incorporated throughout your home, you need to start from the basics: the material types you choose to construct it with. Contrary to elements that can easily be switched from time to time, flooring is one thing that you have to put a lot of thought into, as it will become the basis of your interior and requires a bigger hustle to change than, say, installing new wallpaper.

We prepared a list of the five best flooring types you should consider when designing a minimalist home!

1. Marble

The first place on our list goes to the ultimate minimalist material – marble. It is one of the safest options to go for when designing a minimalist home, but you have to ensure that the various design aspects you decide to go for will flow together with the floor type. The exclusive stone not only provides a touch of luxury in your home but also makes for a durable and long-lasting surface, with its hard facade being resistant to everyday damages.

With a wide array of different marble finishes available on the market, you can easily suit a finish that will go along to the design of your home, making not only for a minimalistic design of your overall space but also for flooring that adapts itself to virtually any space.

The beautiful and luxurious touches of marble do come with a catch – the price. Marble can be a costly material to use for flooring around your home, depending on the type, amount, and finish you want to go for. That’s why many people opt to allocate marble to smaller areas of the home, rather than covering the entire area with the precious stone.

2. Wood

Wood is a versatile material, as it can create a lot of different interior looks dependent on the type of wood you decide to include around your home. However, modern wood panels offer a wide range of simplistic wooden floorings that will easily fit your minimalist design.

A great way to incorporate a sleek minimalist wooden floor in your home, without going over your designated budget is to opt for click flooring. Those types of wooden panels are a relatively new type of wood flooring available on the market. Their specific design makes them much cheaper than standard wooden panels and much more durable.

Click flooring also creates the imitation of real wooden boards, with the extra thickness caused by its unique construction, as well as an easy installation process that will save you money along the way.

Photo by Vecislavas Popa from Pexels

3. Concrete

Many people associate concrete flooring with the rawness of the first stages of constructing your home, but maybe the goal should be for it to stay this way. Concrete is one of the most minimalistic materials you can use, with its simple look forming a unique yet very simplistic interior.

The concrete used for flooring has a different consistency than the one used for building, so don’t let the dull look of construction concrete diminish your dreams of a minimalist design. It’s incredibly durable and can spice up any place with it’s SoHo aesthetic, yet, keeping the site minimalistic and not over complicated.

Of course, make sure the concrete is polished and impregnated with dedicated substances after it has been poured. This is recommended to be made by a polished concrete and epoxy company. This way you will obtain a unique look without making it feel too cold.

4. Tile

Tile is an excellent material to opt for if your dream is to live in minimalism. Not only does it look great in a wide array of areas, but it is also relatively easy to maintain. Contemporary tile flooring is also usually pretty budget-friendly, so you can rest assured that it won’t drain your bank account in the process. You can go for very simplistic tile designs, such as simple white tiles, which will leave any room look complete, yet not overcrowded.

Photo by Sonnie Hiles on Unsplash

5. Carpets

We’re leaving this one till the end, as we know some people are huge carpet fans, while others can’t stand the thought of them. Carpets are a great flooring type if you have kids or want a comfortable floor that will allow you to feel comfortable around your home at all times. Carpets can usually be chosen at any budget region, from the exclusive imported materials to cheaper, but still pretty cozy designs.

They are also a great way of protecting the hardwood flooring underneath if you’re planning on renting out your home in the future or trying to sell it without having to worry about floor damages that would depreciate the price of your home.

Carpets are simply a great way to create a coherent, comfortable, and minimalistic interior without having to do all the construction work associated with installing new flooring tiles.

Concluding

Moving into a new home always requires a lot of work beforehand, which is why knowing the type of design you want to opt for is a great way to reduce any inconsistencies that may arise during the process. It will allow you to keep to a designated style and create a coherently looking space.

The times of stacking up your living room with a wide array of accessories and furniture are long gone, and simplicity is the key to modern design nowadays. If you’re starting your journey with designing your home, it may be helpful to work with a professional architect, in order for you to fully be able to incorporate your vision into reality.

Keep being AllDayChic!

Tags : flooringhome designminimalist design

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